4 Job Tips During Corona

4 Job Tips During Corona

4 Job Tips During Corona

Most HR departments and managers are just getting everyone up to speed on the logistics and daily routines of a fully remote workforce so it might be difficult to reach people in the first few weeks of the transition, says Kathleen Landers, executive director of SEQUENCE Counseling and Consulting Services in Silver Spring, MD. Plus, “people have a lot of concerns—they might have elderly parents, relatives in other countries, young children to take care of, even their own health issues.”

Be prepared for job openings to be put on hold or disappear, even if they’ve been open for a while. That doesn’t mean they won’t open up again in a few months. Landers admits she herself was getting ready to hire someone but decided to put that on hold for a few weeks. “If I can tell my business will maintain the same level of income and consumers will still want the product, then I will move ahead,” she says.

With all that said, you can still be actively working on your job search. These tips will help you navigate the process during the pandemic and the accompanying economic slowdown.

Spain unemployment rate at 13-year high - CNN.com

A. Think Your Urgency

If you can afford to put your job search on hold, you may want to wait it out, Landers says, because it could be challenging to get on a hiring manager’s radar right now. “If you’re currently employed, think about how to make your job more palatable,” says Nancy Halpern, founder of Political IQ, a Manhattan-based leadership-consulting firm focused on developing emotional intelligence. “If you’re not employed, don’t think of your next job as the perfect job. It might be short term.”

U.S. jobless claims surge - Georgia Asian Times

While many industries have and will continue to be hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, others are still hiring. If you’re unemployed and need a stopgap, consider looking there or wherever else you can find an opportunity that makes sense for you—and pays the rent and puts food on the table—in the meantime.

B. Get Suitable Networking Online

Events will be cancelled for a while, so you’ll need to find a new networking strategy. Seek out like-minded professionals online and ask about virtual events, Halpern says.

Look for professional groups to join on Facebook and LinkedIn. Both platforms offer a wide range of options with groups for every profession. For instance, if you’re looking for a job in marketing, you could join LinkedIn’s Global Marketing and Communications Professionals group. “Join in the conversation, post and comment, and make yourself visible,” Halpern says. Just be sure to keep the conversation professional by posting relevant articles and chiming in on topics that allow you to demonstrate your expertise.

Get ready to ace a virtual informational interview or networking chat by practicing with a friend, says Laura Labovich, CEO of The Career Strategy Group in Bethesda, MD. Have your friend ask questions and give you feedback on your delivery. Make sure you know how to angle the camera so the person you’re meeting with can see your entire face, not just your forehead or your left eye. Once you’ve mastered the technology, invite professional contacts to meet for a virtual coffee.

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C. Stay In Connection

Maybe you recently had a promising interview and a job offer seemed to be on the horizon, but now the company has moved to remote work and you haven’t heard from the hiring manager. What should you do? Check in with the hiring manager by email, acknowledging that they might be scrambling to help their employees get used to the new setup, Moser says.

For instance, your email could say: “I’m looking forward to learning more when it makes sense for your organization.” This conveys that you know this is an extraordinary circumstance and acknowledges that this isn’t easy for people, she says.

Make sure you also demonstrate a thoughtful attitude. Rather than asking them to help you, ask if there is anything you can assist them with, Moser says. The idea is to connect with people on a human level, she says. Let’s say you’re contacting someone you’ve networked with in the past. Your email can simply say: “I wanted to reach out to see if there’s anything I can do for you.

You’ve been so generous with your time, I want to return the favor if I can.” If you have a specific skill a hiring manager might be able to tap into, mention it. You might say: “Given that I’ve led virtual teams, I might have some ideas to share on how to keep your employees feeling connected when they’re not in the office.”

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Networking should be driven by what the company needs and how it matches up with your superpower,” Moser says. “It’s also an opportunity to demonstrate what type of employee you would be.”

And find other ways to stay top of mind in addition to email. For instance, connect with the hiring manager on LinkedIn and, if they post a status, comment on it, Labovich says. If the hiring manager posts a company report or press release, make a comment that illustrates you read it and have valuable insight to contribute. Pretend you’re giving them a preview of what you’d add to the team if you worked there.

D. Gather Intel

The COVID-19 crisis can provide a unique glimpse into company culture. Take note of how leadership deals with this emergency and treats its employees by following the company on social media and watching for any media coverage, says Heidi Parsont, CEO and founder of TorchLight Hire in Alexandria, VA. For instance, is the company allowing employees to work from home? Are they supporting workers in other creative ways? Did they lay off staff?

Set up Google alerts for the companies you want to work for and listen to investor calls, Labovich says. When you do have a chance to interview, you’ll be able to demonstrate that you understand the concerns leadership has and the threats the company faces from this pandemic, she says. You can mention what you read and listened to and use your specific knowledge to drive home how you could help the company achieve its goals if hired.

5 Best freelancing jobs during COVID 19 crisis

E. Use the Time to Reflection

Job seekers often jump at the first available opportunity or go into their search without fully considering what they want to do next. Take advantage of the slowing job market by getting clarity about where you want to work and the type of role and title you’re seeking.

Create a one-page document that lists your target industry, companies, job titles, and anything in particular you’re looking for, Labovich says. It goes without saying that you should apply to every posting you see that hits some or all of your criteria. But beyond job openings, you can also focus on which companies you want to work for and who you can reach out to at those companies. (The company might not have an open role yet but you can use your network to help you start making connections now.)

Be prepared to think about your role more broadly and possibly pivot to an adjacent position that would also make use of your experience and skills. For instance, you might have been targeting a marketing role but with fewer people spending money, the company might be more inclined to hire someone for a communications role during this crisis. “Play the long game,” Lander says. “There is a lot of shifting going on right now.”

Conclusion

Now is the perfect time to work on bolstering your qualifications, Moser says. Analyze job descriptions by listing each required skill and experience. Then consider whether you have that exact skill, if you have the skill but haven’t used it in a few years, or if you’re lacking the skill entirely. Use that information to determine what you need to brush up on to make yourself an even better candidate when the job market picks up again.

For instance, if you’re applying for social media or marketing specialist positions, the listing will likely require experience with Google Analytics and Hootsuite. Being certified in either or both would make your resume stand out.

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Corona is No 1 Risk in USA

Corona is No 1 Risk in USA :

What is the Federal Government Doing to Fight Corona Virus.Corona : #1 Risk in America.

Corona is No 1 Risk in USA : In March, President Trump declared a national emergency over the corona virus pandemic, effectively freeing up to $50 billion in federal funds to help states and territories fight the spread of the virus, which he said would include expanding access to testing.

US medical workers demand more help from the federal government to ...

Still, there have been many issues with the availability of the corona virus test. Though testing capacity has improved, there are still widespread shortages. In many areas, state health officials and medical providers say they are unable to test as many people as they would like to, and tests remain available only to those who meet specific criteria.

Public-health officials say that far more testing — for both the virus and antibodies — will be needed in order to safely reopen the economy.Speaking April 27, President Trump announced a plan to increase federal support to states to provide increased testing, saying that the U.S.

would “double” the number of tests it had been conducting.Currently, the U.S. is conducting about 300,000 tests a day. While an improvement, experts say this still falls far short of the number of tests needed, which is more like 5 million tests a day by June and 20 million tests a day by late July.Trump Is Claiming Coloradans Are Showering Him With Thank You ...

On March 19, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the U.S. would close its borders with Canada and Mexico, barring entry to all nonessential travelers.

 President Trump has also barred entry of all foreign nationals who have been in high-risk countries, including China, Iran, and much of Europe, within the last 14 days. The CDC has advised against all nonessential travel throughout most of Europe, South Korea, China, and Iran and has advised older and at-

risk Americans to avoid travel to any country.On March 27,President Trump signed a $2 trillion stimulus plan, the largest in modern American history, which will send direct payments of around $1,200 to millions of Americans who earn less than $99,000, along with an additional $500 per child.

Corona is No 1 Risk in USA

The first round of deposits went out on April 11. The plan also substantially expands unemployment benefits, including extending eligibility to freelance and gig workers, and provides aid to businesses and companies in distress.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has extended the tax-filing deadline to July 15, and President Trump signed another $484 billion relief package in late April, which will provide aid to small businesses and funding for hospitals and testing.

On May 15, the House approved a new $3 trillion relief package, which would include nearly $1 trillion in aid to state and local governments, as well as another round of $1,200 payments to Americans.Researchers have made a number of early steps toward a vaccine that look promising.

A corona virus vaccine that has been tested in eight people appears to be safe and effective, according to the manufacturer, Moderna, which plans to begin additional tests soon.On May 5, Pfizer and the German pharmaceutical company BioNTech announced that they were beginning human trials for a possible coronavirus vaccine in the U.S., and the U.S. government has pledged to provide up to     $1.2  billion for vaccine research   to  the drug company AstrZeneca.However, U.S. government officials have said that producing a widely available vaccine could take a year to 18 months.On Monday night, President Trump Threatened to permanently cut off U.S.

funding to the World Health Organization, which he has accused of failing to act quickly and aggressively to stop the early spread of the virus — a criticism that has been leveled at his own administration. Trump halted funding to the WHO last month in an apparent attempt to shift the blame for the fallout from the pandemic, a decision that was met with widespread criticism from global leaders.

What should I do to minimize my coronavirus risk?


Corona : #1 Risk in America: In most cases, COVID-19 is not fatal, but it appears to pose the greatest risk to elderly people and those with preexisting conditions that compromise their immune systems. According to the CDC, eight out of 10 deaths from COVID-19 in the U.S. have been adults age 65 and older. Doctors and medical workers may also be at greater risk, due to their higher-than-average odds of exposure, and data shows that in many areas, including New York, black and Latino Americans have been dying at disproportionate rates.

On April 10, President Trump said that the CDC is now recommending that Americans wear masks when they are out in public, though he stressed that the guidelines were voluntary, and said he would not wear a mask himself. On April 15, Cuomo signed an executive order requiring New York residents to wear face coverings in public settings where they are not able to stay six feet away from other people, including buses, subways, sidewalks, and grocery stores.

Los Angeles has also ordered residents to wear masks when visiting essential businesses.The guidance on masks seems to be driven in part by concern about the number of asymptomatic individuals who may be infected and transmitting the virus. Speaking on April 5, Fauci estimated that between 25 and 50 percent of those infected with the virus may not experience any symptoms.

If you have symptoms associated with coronavirus — coughing, fever, respiratory issues — call your doctor before showing up at their office: The virus is highly contagious and you want to limit the possibility of spreading it. If you are sick, the CDC recommends that you stay home and self-isolate, confining yourself to one room as much as possible and wearing a face mask when you have to interact with others. Wash your hands frequently

— soap and water and at least 20 seconds of scrubbing — and avoid touching shared household items, cleaning “high-touch” surfaces (like your phone) regularly. Your health-care provider and even local health department will help you determine how long it’s appropriate for you to keep up these precautions.Regardless of whether or not you have symptoms, though, keep your hands clean, and seriously, stop touching your face and just stay home.

The day we meet is the day the first coronavirus case has been confirmed in his area, but Sebastian says that while his family have seen all the news about the virus, their reality remains the same.”Being undocumented it’s hard to get medical attention. There’s the aspect of presenting yourself to the legal system at medical facilities and that runs the risk of deportation,” he says.”My family may not be criminals, but they sure are undocumented and seeing a doctor scares them.”For everyone in the US, whether they are undocumented or not, there is also the huge expense involved in even just seeing a doctor.

More than 27 million people in America have no medical insurance at all, a number that has been growing dramatically during the Trump presidency.A consultation with a doctor for someone without insurance costs hundreds of dollars.But there are tens of millions more who are classed as being “underinsured” – having basic insurance that often only covers a fraction of the cost of any check ups or treatment.”During the flu season we are getting sick a lot, but taking my children to see their paediatrician costs $100 each visit just for a check,” says Lisa Rubio, 28, who has basic health insurance through her employer.

“I started with a cough and a sore throat a week ago, but if the doctor tells me they can’t prescribe anything, that it’s just a virus, I have to decide whether it’s worth it to take away money from my bills and my children’s other needs.”Last year, being underinsured contributed to a devastating episode for Lisa.”I got sick. I felt pain coming in my chest. But for me to go see a doctor even though I am insured, I couldn’t afford it so I tried to ignore the pain.

“”Two weeks later, in the middle of the night, my lung just collapsed completely. They had to do intensive care but said if I had caught it sooner, it would have been better,” she says.Lisa suffers these problems even though she herself is an administrator in a hospital in Tucson.Dr Grivois-Shah says that even before the coronavirus, the huge number of patients going undiagnosed with HIV or other sexually transmitted infections was just one example of the public health crises being exacerbated because so many have no access to healthcare.

“I have not seen any evidence that anything is going to be different with the coronavirus,” he says, unconvinced by the promises from Washington.”For decades, we’ve been okay as a society knowing that there are so many in our community who are uninsured, underinsured, undocumented and unable to take sick leave,” he says.”These individuals without access to care are going to get sicker, are going to spread the disease more frequently because they’re not getting care or isolating, or getting diagnosed and treated. And we are going to pay the public health price because of what our society is okay with.”As it sweeps across nations, the coronavirus is exposing systemic flaws.

In China, it was freedom of information; here in the US it is the massive disparities in the way people are treated depending on their economic circumstances and their immigration status.The coronavirus of course does not discriminate on those grounds and having large sections of society being unable to see a doctor is suddenly in focus as not just being bad for the individuals themselves, but for the country a whole.

5-Step Guide for First Careers in this CORONA ERA

5-Step Guide for First Careers in this CORONA ERA

5-Step Guide for First Careers in this CORONA ERA


The graduating class of 2020 will go down in the history books for their FaceTime commencement ceremonies, for their online final exams, and for their (just assuming) epic virtual underground frat parties.

But, soon, it will be an extremely weird time to be a recent college graduate who’s looking for their first job during a rather … unprecedented moment in time.

jobeduresultcorona

While it’s still too soon to know how the coronavirus pandemic is going to impact the economy in the long-term, it’s probably fair to say the graduate career fairs will be few and far between this spring. There will be no in-person employer events.

The campus career center might not have all the answers. Long story short, the post-grad job search is likely to feel like more of a minefield than usual this year. And it’s likely to feel a lot lonelier, too.

I graduated just as the economy was getting back on its feet after the global financial crisis — and I still stumbled, rather inelegantly, into the land of grown-up employment.

Scoring my first real job took months on end. Joining the working world basically felt like I was at the bottom of Everest, staring up into the clouds, unclear on how to take my first step toward the summit. I’m almost a decade past my own graduation, but I never forgot that feeling.

Instead, I got obsessed with making it feel less scary for the next wave of college graduates, and wound up becoming an entry-level career coach when I was only 25 myself.

If you’re about to graduate into this season of lockdowns and virtual socializing, it might feel tempting to cocoon and cross your fingers and wait until it’s all over — but we don’t know when exactly when “over” is coming yet. Instead, I have a couple of ideas for how to put yourself out there and stand out during these crazy times.

5-Step Guide for First Careers in this CORONA ERA

Studies show that 70-80% of jobs never get posted online — they get filled directly through personal referrals instead. Networking is key to any successful job search, and it doesn’t have to stop just because you can’t meet someone in person.

Instead of submitting hundreds of resumes online: use this time to shoot your shot, introduce yourself over email, and ask out a professional hero of yours on a virtual coffee date. (You might be even more successful booking these dates than you would have been before, considering everybody’s stuck at home just like you are!)

Internships can be a key differentiator for graduates looking to stand out in the market, with employers saying internship experience is often the deciding factor for otherwise equal candidates. But what on earth are you supposed to do if your intern offer gets rescinded or you can’t find an internship right away?

Look for alternative ways to get the experience you need over these next few months. You could join a volunteer campaign or offer to help out a local small business. You could organize a virtual effort of some kind for your neighbors or for people across the globe.

You could pitch your own internship, too. Plenty of companies will use this down time to do some administrative “spring cleaning” they’ve been meaning to get to for years, for example. Propose the idea, offer your services, and you might just get the job.

More than ever, people will be turning to your online presence to get a better understanding of who you are and what you’re about. Make sure that your virtual first impression is as pristine and professional as you’d like it to be.

The key is to go a step beyond just “hiding” your personal life from the world. Think, instead, about how you can impress them with your online presence. What if you did a series of interviews with senior people in your field and wrote about what you learned on LinkedIn?

Not every company goes through hard times when the economy hits a bump in the road. Make a list of businesses that do well – that maybe even do better – if people are stuck at home: delivery companies, video streaming services, home exercise equipment manufacturers, online dating sites, and many more.

Across the world right now, senior executives are working from home for the first time ever. This is a totally unprecedented situation and very few people are experts at virtual work. That, in itself, presents an opportunity.

How do teams keep their spirits up when everybody is at home? What’s the best way to flag issues to your manager? How do people get their work equipment set up at home? What are the pros and cons of the various software systems people are using in order to stay in touch?

Set out to educate yourself on a specific aspect of remote work (team culture, technical set up, meeting etiquette, you name it) so that you can add value to your new team from day one.

In every situation — yes, even in pandemics — there are little opportunities to reach out and make yourself useful. By focusing in on what you can bring to the table, and communicating that value clearly, you’ll find a way to get through this job search with grace.

Jobs after Corona Pandemic

Over the past 10 days, the U.S. economy has been rocked by corona virus pandemic. The Economic Policy Institute estimates that the corona virus outbreak could eliminate 3 million jobs in the United States by summer, and the United Nations estimates that nearly 25 million jobs could be lost worldwide.

jobeduresult.comcorona virus

Still, some are optimistic that hiring will continue in select industries that have not been negatively impacted by coronavirus. 

Amazon recently announced it is hiring an additional 100,000 employees in the U.S. to meet a surge in demand from online shopping.

“Though the outbreak is impacting the way we work, it’s not impacting our business needs — and as a result, hiring needs are still crucial and open positions still need to be filled to continue providing strong business outcomes and value,” Peter Baskin, chief product officer at Modern Hire explains to CNBC Make It.

CNBC Make It spoke with job seekers and industry experts to see what it’s like to look for a job during the pandemic.

A shockingly tough job market

Looking for a new job is uniquely difficult during the coronavirus outbreak because many organizations are laying off employees and traditional ways of hiring have also been disrupted. 

Cheryn Shin, a senior at Wellesley College majoring in English and creative writing, says she has spent the past few months looking for a full-time job to start after graduation. But because of the pandemic, her job search has become even harder. 

“It feels like even fewer companies are looking to hire,” she says. 

Jasmyne Keimig is a culture writer living in Seattle, a so-called “hot spot” for corona virus. She was recently laid off from her job writing at The Stranger, a biweekly newspaper, due to a drop in revenue.

“When I got suddenly laid off by The Stranger, it was shocking,” Keimig tells CNBC Make It. “Though my employers encouraged me to get on unemployment, I was very aware that I was dropped into a tumultuous job market along with thousands of other people in similar situations.”

“On top of that, much of the casual and part-time labor I’d relied on previously had dried up due to the social distancing measures in place,” she says. “It was a devastating blow both professionally and financially. My community has been extremely supportive of me and for that I’m thankful.” 

Workers in the service industry have been hit particularly hard. 

Natalee Cruz was working as a hostess at the New York City restaurant Chinese Tuxedo when it was required to close on Monday, March 16. She says managementstarted a GoFundMe to raise donations for the staffand promised to rehire everyone once they can re-open.

Without her primary job and no firm date for when restaurants will be allowed to re-open in New York, Cruz is supporting herself with a part-time freelance writing position that pays $975 every two weeks. 

“It doesn’t feel like I can look for other jobs right now. There’s just so much uncertainty going on, and I don’t think this is necessarily a hiring market,” she tells CNBC Make It. “The biggest battle we need to be fighting right now is containment. It’s not going to be comfortable, but I can find a way to get by.”

Technological growing pains 

While the future of the job market remains unpredictable, what is certain is that how workers are hired has changed — starting with the interview process.

“In response to COVID-19, many companies such as Twitter, Google, Amazon, Target, Ford and Fiat Chrysler, have switched over to video interviews for job candidates,” Kathy Gardner, senior director of public relations for job site FlexJobs tells CNBC Make It. 

Gardner stresses that applicants need to give themselves additional time before an interview to adjust to the technology, and they should consider factors such as audio settings, camera settings and internet connection strength. 

The technological transition from in-person to online interviews is expected to be bumpy for many workers and employers. 

“As more and more of the workforce is working from home indefinitely due to COVID-19, HR teams will rely more heavily on video interviewing, which will lead to the need to reevaluate the technology that they’re using,” says Baskin. “While tools like Hangouts, Zoom or GoToMeeting are convenient, they’re not designed to fit interviewing needs — which could, in turn, impact the quality of the interview, and eventually, the quality of the candidates being hired.”

He says that in the future, companies will develop virtual interview platforms that cater to their organization’s specific needs, whether that’s group interview or test administration capabilities.

And this technological transition brings a new host of best practices that applicants need to consider during an interview.

“Make sure you present yourself well virtually. It’s not enough to just dress nicely, you want to demonstrate that you are adaptable in any environment,” Brian Buck, CEO of Scotwork North America, a negotiation consulting firm, tells CNBC Make It. 

Additionally, applicants need to consider how their body language comes across on screen, especially since being at home can lure them into a false sense of informality. 

“Place both feet on the ground, and avoid doing things like slouching or holding your head up with your hand. And always try to keep your hands in your lap to avoid distracting gesturing or fiddling,” says Gardner. “It’s also important to pay attention to where you’re looking. Looking at the interviewer’s face on your computer screen means you’re not actually looking into the camera and making eye contact.”

A disadvantage while negotiating

For those workers who do manage to land a new role, they may be at a disadvantage when it comes to negotiating for their salary and benefits because of the current labor market and economy.

In the near term, negotiating could be harder for applicants “as companies are working through understanding all the impacts of COVID-19 on their business,” says Buck. “However, as companies become accustomed to the new normal, it will get easier to have these types of conversations.”

“My advice is to be mindful of the other party’s situation and pick the appropriate course of action,” he says. “In the industries that are being negatively impacted, the right course of action might be to pause. In the industries that are experiencing positive impacts, the right course of action might be to be proactive and push your agenda.”

Job seekers should research how much an organization typically pays for a given role and be prepared to provide clear evidence for why they are deserving of their desired salary. 

“Don’t be afraid to tell them what you want. If you’ve done your homework, you’ll be able to anchor the negotiation in your favor,” says Buck. “But be realistic while being optimistic.”

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