7 Best Ways to Make Money in This COVID-19

77 / 100

7 Best Ways to Make Money in This COVID-19 

Consider these top resources to make money online:

Depending on whether you’re looking to earn extra money quickly or build a long-term income stream, each of the following websites offers unique advantages (and sometimes disadvantages) tailored to different needs and interests. Read on for more information on each site.

Upwork

How it works:Upwork is essentially a meeting site where businesses and freelancers throughout the world can connect and collaborate on certain projects. Businesses hire freelancers for a variety of different services, including writing, web design, running SEO campaigns and pretty much any work that can be done on a computer.

Highlights: Upwork takes a commission from 5% to 20%, but the more money you make, the less the commission is.

Drawbacks: Upwork has been so successful that there is a lot of competition on the website, and that can be a real drawback for people who are new to the site, says Sacha DeRosa, owner of a digital marketing agency in Toronto called The Shirtless Web Guy.

“Before I started my business in web design, I created profiles on websites such as Upwork. In the beginning it was a struggle to attract any attention from buyers on those platforms because there’s so much competition. And much of the competition was from overseas, which made it impossible for me to compete with others on price.”

So DeRosa lowered his prices and for a while, he was working for next to nothing. But the positive feedback made his profile look better, and DeRosa started charging more.

toHySMIc1Zkda777wcEKkRZGkSGaqjg29f4tfGpO

Fiverr

How it works: This is also a popular website that can be helpful for freelancers. Know something about digital animation? You can work for someone who doesn’t have these skills and pick up some extra cash. Even better, you can offer to compile web research for someone for fast cash.

Highlights: You can make good money from the site, asserts Dan Bochichio, a web designer and digital strategist in Albany, New York, who runs a two-person company called Bocain Designs. He says that his firm makes $3,000 to $5,000 a month from Fiverr. “To stay ahead of the competition, I make sure my Fiverr profile and gig descriptions are well written and communicate the value of the services I’m offering. When someone reaches out to me, I make sure to reply as quickly as I can and follow up with to inquiry by asking good questions.

A quick, but carefully written reply will increase the odds of them hiring you drastically,” Bochichio says.Drawbacks: Bochichio’s success aside, Fiverr’s name comes from the fact that many people used to work for $5 a task. You can ask for more (and arguably should), but a lot of your prospective clients are probably expecting you to work for next to nothing.

Etsy

How it works:If you’re artistic and are the type of person who can make custom jewelry or refrigerator magnets, Etsy is the place to sell your products.

Highlights: It’s easy to navigate the site and set up a shop.Drawbacks: There’s a lot of competition on the website. On one hand, the branding is big, and a lot of people know about Etsy. But once you put up your wares, as with Upwork and Fiverr, you are one in a gazillion people selling stuff on Etsy. It may feel a little overwhelming.

TaskRabbit

How it works:Are you willing to get your hands dirty? People come to this site to find those willing to do various tasks, such as putting together a bookcase, cleaning a garage or running an errand. Do as many tasks as you want, and this could become quite the part-time (or full-time) job.

Highlights: You can apply for tasks, but you can also put up a profile, explaining what tasks you’re available for and skilled at, and people may end up seeking you out for work.Drawbacks: A lot of the tasks you’ll find on TaskRabbit are, as noted, physical – like setting up furniture. Of course, if that’s your jam, that’s a plus.

Wonder

How it works:People come to this site when they need research done. Wonder doesn’t hire just anyone, but you can apply. The process takes about five minutes, according to the website. And if Wonder thinks you have the skills to do research, you’ll get access to its dashboard. You can then choose to answer a question – perhaps coming from a business executive or an author writing a book.

Highlights: Researchers report making, on average, $8 to $16 for each detailed answer, and job sites suggest researchers can make, on average, about $20 an hour. In short, Wonder offers an ideal gig for those who really enjoy the process of doing research, as opposed to those who just want to make fast money.Drawbacks: As noted, the money is not spectacular, especially if you spend a lot of time answering questions. If that happens to you a lot, you may wonder why you’re using Wonder.

ThredUp

How it works:With the tagline “secondhand clothes, firsthand fun,” this e-commerce company appeals to thrifty types looking to make money and sell their clutter for cash. The online thrift store sells women’s and kid’s clothes. Here’s how it works: You send your clothes in a ThredUp bag with a prepaid mailing label, and ThredUp will decide the value. They’re looking for nice clothes and popular brands, and keep in mind there’s a fee if your items aren’t accepted.

So, if you have clothes better suited for a yard sale, hold a yard sale. But if you have quality outfits you no longer want, ThredUp enables you to sell unwanted items and may even pay you enough so that you can buy new threads.

Highlights: The process is pretty easy. ThredUp will send you a prepaid bag to put your clothes in, or a shipping label if you prefer.Drawbacks: You won’t get paid (naturally) until your clothes reach ThredUp, and they’ve been accepted. But if they aren’t accepted, you will have to pay a fee to have them shipped back to you – or they can responsibly recycle them.

Swap

How it works:Like ThredUp, Swap is an online consignment store. After you send in used clothes and toys and games, Swap will sell them for you. As for how much you can make, the website explains that if something is priced for less than $10, you’ll get a 30% credit to buy something from Swap.com – or 20% of the sale price back in cash.

If your item sells between $10 and $20, you’ll earn a 50% credit or 40% back in cash. If it sells for more than $20, you’ll receive a 70% credit or 60% cash.

Highlights: It’s easier than, say, selling on Facebook Marketplace, where you generally must meet somebody to hand off an item. And aside from collecting stuff in your home, and putting items in a prepaid box sent to you, the process is pretty easy.Drawbacks: As with ThredUp, you may have your clothes rejected, which means either you won’t get them back – or you’ll pay a fee to have them returned to you.

Join to Chat

17 Comments

  1. certainly like your web site but you have to check the spelling on quite a few of your posts. Many of them are rife with spelling issues and I find it very troublesome to tell the truth nevertheless I will definitely come back again.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*